Scientists May Have Found A Way To Cure Baldness

Researchers at the New York University School of Medicine have made an intriguing discovery that could make hair loss a thing of the past.

The NYU scientists say the secret to reversing hair loss is all about activating something called the ‘sonic hedgehog signalling pathway’.

The sonic hedgehog gene plays an important part in embryo development and was  — bizarrely — named in honour of the SEGA video game character, after postdoctorate fellow Dr Robert Riddle saw the famous critter in his six-year-old daughter’s comic book.

video games sega GIF

By activating the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, the researchers were able to create “crosstalk among skin cells that form the roots of hair” and regrow hair strands on damaged skin, NYU Langone Health reported.

While the SHH pathway is quite active when a fetus is growing and developing follicles,  it is “otherwise stalled in wounded skin in healthy adults”.

Which is apparently why hair stops growing in places that have been wounded or undergone surgery.

“Our results show that stimulating fibroblasts through the sonic hedgehog pathway can trigger hair growth not previously seen in wound healing,” said study senior investigator and cell biologist Mayumi Ito, PhD.

(Getty Images)

Researchers conducted these experiments on mice over a three-year period and are planning future investigations on wounded human skin. Dr Ito says her goal is to identify likely drug targets for hair regrowth.

Which is good news for anyone hoping for a little more coverage on their chrome dome.

Although we personally think beloved celebrities like Danny Devito, Jason Alexander, Terry Crews, and Bruce Willis are perfect the way they are without the help of a stimulated sonic hedgehog.

[“source=cnbc”]

Thousands are told in A&E they have cancer

More than 41,000 new patients are diagnosed with cancer annually. Stock Image: Getty

More than 3,000 patients a year are only finding out they have cancer when they attend a hospital A&E department.

The alarming revelation comes as new figures show cancer has overtaken heart disease as the biggest killer.

More than 41,000 new patients are diagnosed with cancer annually including non-invasive forms of the disease, according to the annual report of the National Cancer Registry.

A growing and ageing population has contributed to an 85pc rise in cases since the mid 1990s.

However for thousands of patients the diagnosis will only be made after they present as emergencies and they account for 14pc of cases, excluding non-melanoma skin cancers.

This can result from lack of awareness of symptoms or being on a long waiting list for access to scans.

They usually have advanced disease, limited treatment options and poorer prognosis.

Overall, cancer claims the lives of 9,094 people annually with lung cancer the main killer for men and women.

Non-melanoma skin cancer, prostate cancer and breast cancer were the most commonly diagnosed cancers.

The risk of dying of cancer was about 34pc higher for men who tend to present later for care than for women.

The stark forecast is that cancer figures could almost double by 2045.

However,survival has improved markedly for cancers as a whole and for the most common cancer types since the mid-1990s.

The overall five-year net survival increased from 40pc for men during 1994-1998 to 62pc during 2010-2014.

Among women the five-year net survival increased from 48pc during 1994-1998 to 60pc during 2010-2014.

It means Ireland has a record 173,000 cancer survivors who were previously diagnosed with an invasive cancer other than non-melanoma skin cancer,

The top four most common cancers among survivors are breast cancer , prostate cancer, bowel cancer and melanoma skin cancer.

The survival rate for non-melanoma skin cancer is best at 99.8pc, followed by prostate cancer at 92pc.

Survival

Survival for breast cancer is 83pc, bowel cancer 63pc and for lung cancer 18pc.

An analysis of the report by the Irish Cancer Society shows show rates remain highest in the most deprived areas.

There is a greater risk in getting lung cancer in areas such as north-inner city Dublin and west Dublin as well as certain area of Donegal, Louth, Longford, Carlow, Galway, Limerick and Cork.

Lung cancer and head and neck cancer incidence is 1.7 times higher among the least well off. Cervical cancer incidence is 1.9 times greater among poorer communities.

Men in areas with the lowest education levels have a 32pc greater risk of lung cancer than men living in areas with the highest level, while it is 23pc greater for women.

It said that the designation of cancer into eight hospital centres have contributed to more survival, but more is left to do.

Cancer patients from the most disadvantaged communities are 50pc more likely to be diagnosed after attending A&E.

Responding to the figures, Averil Power of the Irish Cancer Society said they were a “wake-up call” that must prompt immediate action.

“While these projections are stark, they need not become a reality,” she said.

“By improving our lifestyles and availing of free screening each of us can dramatically reduce our risk of getting cancer.

“Four in 10 cancers are preventable. We can all reduce our risk of getting cancer by eating healthily, exercising and limiting our alcohol intake.”

She called for more measures to address health inequalities. “Disadvantaged groups are still more likely to get, and die, from cancer than more privileged groups,” she said.

“We won’t stand for that. We will continue to call for better access to cancer tests for all, increased uptake of screening programmes and no barriers to seeing doctors.”

[“source=medicalnewstoday]

Thousands are told in A&E they have cancer

More than 41,000 new patients are diagnosed with cancer annually. Stock Image: Getty

More than 3,000 patients a year are only finding out they have cancer when they attend a hospital A&E department.

The alarming revelation comes as new figures show cancer has overtaken heart disease as the biggest killer.

More than 41,000 new patients are diagnosed with cancer annually including non-invasive forms of the disease, according to the annual report of the National Cancer Registry.

A growing and ageing population has contributed to an 85pc rise in cases since the mid 1990s.

However for thousands of patients the diagnosis will only be made after they present as emergencies and they account for 14pc of cases, excluding non-melanoma skin cancers.

This can result from lack of awareness of symptoms or being on a long waiting list for access to scans.

They usually have advanced disease, limited treatment options and poorer prognosis.

Overall, cancer claims the lives of 9,094 people annually with lung cancer the main killer for men and women.

Non-melanoma skin cancer, prostate cancer and breast cancer were the most commonly diagnosed cancers.

The risk of dying of cancer was about 34pc higher for men who tend to present later for care than for women.

[“source=medicalnewstoday]