Scientists May Have Found A Way To Cure Baldness

Researchers at the New York University School of Medicine have made an intriguing discovery that could make hair loss a thing of the past.

The NYU scientists say the secret to reversing hair loss is all about activating something called the ‘sonic hedgehog signalling pathway’.

The sonic hedgehog gene plays an important part in embryo development and was  — bizarrely — named in honour of the SEGA video game character, after postdoctorate fellow Dr Robert Riddle saw the famous critter in his six-year-old daughter’s comic book.

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By activating the sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway, the researchers were able to create “crosstalk among skin cells that form the roots of hair” and regrow hair strands on damaged skin, NYU Langone Health reported.

While the SHH pathway is quite active when a fetus is growing and developing follicles,  it is “otherwise stalled in wounded skin in healthy adults”.

Which is apparently why hair stops growing in places that have been wounded or undergone surgery.

“Our results show that stimulating fibroblasts through the sonic hedgehog pathway can trigger hair growth not previously seen in wound healing,” said study senior investigator and cell biologist Mayumi Ito, PhD.

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Researchers conducted these experiments on mice over a three-year period and are planning future investigations on wounded human skin. Dr Ito says her goal is to identify likely drug targets for hair regrowth.

Which is good news for anyone hoping for a little more coverage on their chrome dome.

Although we personally think beloved celebrities like Danny Devito, Jason Alexander, Terry Crews, and Bruce Willis are perfect the way they are without the help of a stimulated sonic hedgehog.

[“source=cnbc”]

THE 5:2 DIET COULD INCREASE RISK OF DIABETES, SAY SCIENTISTS

Fasting diets could increase the risk of diabetes and cause damaging side effects, new research suggests.

A group of scientists speaking at the European Society of Endocrinology’s annual meeting this weekend revealed that while fasting can help shed weight it can also impair the action of insulin – the sugar-regulating hormone – and lead to an increased risk of diabetes.

As a result, the researchers are urging people to take care before starting a weight loss programme such as the 5:2.

“This is the first study to show that, despite weight loss, intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and affect insulin function in normal healthy individuals, which could lead to diabetes and serious health issues,” said Ana Bonassa, study author from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

In order to investigate the consequences of diets like the 5:2, researchers examined the effects of fasting every other day on the body weight, free radical levels and insulin function of normal, adult rats, over a three-month period.

It found that although the rats’ body weight and food intake decreased as expected over the study period, the amount of fat tissue in their abdomen actually increased.

Furthermore, the cells of the pancreas that release insulin showed damage and there was also a presence of increased levels of free radicals and markers of insulin resistance.

“We should consider that overweight or obese people who opt for intermittent fasting diets may already have insulin resistance, so although this diet may lead to early, rapid weight loss, in the long-term there could be potentially serious damaging effects to their health, such as the development of type-2 diabetes,” Bonassa added.

Although this new data was obtained in normal weight rats with positive effects on weight gain and food intake, the results also suggest that in the long-term harm may be caused.

As such, more investigation is needed to assess how people may be affected, particularly those with existing metabolic issues.

As a result of their findings, the researchers now plan to investigate how this kind of diet impairs pancreas and insulin function.

[“Source-independent”]